6 Improve Maternal Health

Where we are?

From a Maternal Mortality Rate (MMR) of 437 per 100,000 live births in 1990-91, India is required to reduce MMR to 109 per 100,000 live births by 2015. Between 1990 and 2006, there has been some improvement in the Maternal Mortality Rate (MMR) which has declined to 254 per 100,000 live births as compared to 327 in 1990. However, despite this progress, India is expected to fall short of the 2015 target by 26 points. Safe motherhood depends on the delivery by trained personnel, particularly through institutional facilities. However, delivery in institutional facilities has risen slowly from 26 percent in 1992-93 to 47 percent in 2007-08. Consequently, deliveries by skilled personnel have increased at the same pace, from 33 percent to 52 percent in the same period. By 2015, it is expected that India will be able to ensure only 62 percent of births in institutional facilities with trained personnel. Thus, universal coverage remains to be achieved

1.28 years
remaining
until 2015

1990 2015
Achieving the MDGs by 2015: Policy Action for Human Freedoms
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With a few years left to achieve the MDGs, this document provides a quick snapshot of India’s progress towards the MDGs and highlights key recommendations made during a roundtable discussion 'Achieving the MDGs by 2015: Policy Action for Human Freedoms.'

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Millennium Development Goals: India Country Report 2011
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This report by the Government of India assesses the country’s progress towards achieving the MDGs. It focuses on performance against measured outcomes and assesses where the country is likely to be by 2015. In doing so, it attempts to provide a roadmap for future action.

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Targets for MDG 5
  1. Reduce by three quarters the maternal mortality ratio
    • Most maternal deaths could be avoided
    • Giving birth is especially risky in Southern Asia and sub-Saharan Africa, where most women deliver without skilled care
    • The rural-urban gap in skilled care during childbirth has narrowed
  2. Achieve universal access to reproductive health & inadequate funding for family planning is a major failure in fulfilling commitments to improving women’s reproductive health
    • More women are receiving antenatal care
    • Inequalities in care during pregnancy are striking
    • Only one in three rural women in developing regions receive the recommended care during pregnancy
    • Progress has stalled in reducing the number of teenage pregnancies, putting more young mothers at risk
    • Poverty and lack of education perpetuate high adolescent birth rates
    • Progress in expanding the use of contraceptives by women has slowed & use of contraception is lowest among the poorest women and those with no education